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Why say fewer instead of less?

Table of Contents Why say fewer instead of less? Is lesser grammatically correct? Is less used for countable nouns? Do you use...

Table of Contents

  • Why say fewer instead of less?
  • Is lesser grammatically correct?
  • Is less used for countable nouns?
  • Do you use less or fewer with percentages?
  • Is lesser than grammatically correct?
  • What is the difference who and whom?
  • What does fewer than mean in math?
  • Is much fewer grammatically correct?
  • When to use has VS have?
  • When to use was and were?
  • How do you use whom in a sentence?
  • Should have been or should of been?

Why say fewer instead of less?

According to usage rules, fewer is only to be used when discussing countable things, while less is used for singular mass nouns. … To many who have internalized the fewer or less distinction, the answer is yes.

Is lesser grammatically correct?

It would have to either be “less than” or “lesser” only. You would say less than or the lesser of. Not lesser than. However, it largely depends on the sentence in which you’re using your particular example, as it may be that using ‘fewer than’ instead of ‘less than’ is correct.

Is less used for countable nouns?

We use less with uncountable nouns. … (Note that pennies, and pounds are countable but that the noun money is not; we cannot say one money, two money and so on.) She has less beauty than her sister but more intelligence.

Do you use less or fewer with percentages?

Thus, if the percentage turns out to be countable, then one gets a countable quantity. When referring to a group of people, this is usually the case. Therefore, in your example sentence, the absolutely correct choice would be “fewer”: Fewer than 10.7% of the people were happy.

Is lesser than grammatically correct?

It would have to either be “less than” or “lesser” only. You would say less than or the lesser of. Not lesser than. However, it largely depends on the sentence in which you’re using your particular example, as it may be that using ‘fewer than’ instead of ‘less than’ is correct.

What is the difference who and whom?

The difference between who and whom is exactly the same as the difference between I and me, he and him, she and her, etc. Who, like I, he, and she, is a subject – it is the person performing the action of the verb. Whom, like me, him, and her, is an object – it is the person to/about/for whom the action is being done.

What does fewer than mean in math?

The words “fewer than” are special math words that give us a hint about what we need to do in order to get the right answer. Fewer than means the same as less than or a smaller number. We know that the second student has fewer rocks than the first, so that tells us that we need to subtract.

Is much fewer grammatically correct?

Many is an adjective, while much is an adverb. As such, many cannot modify the adjective fewer; only an adverb can modify an adjective. Much fewer is simply more correct than many fewer, despite its cacophony. Many modifies a noun: many apples.

When to use has VS have?

Have is the root VERB and is generally used alongside the PRONOUNS I / You / We / Ye and They and PLURAL NOUNS. Generally, have is a PRESENT TENSE word. Has is used alongside the PRONOUNS He / She / It and Who and SINGULAR NOUNS. However, there are some exceptions which will be explained later on in the lesson.

When to use was and were?

As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently. Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

How do you use whom in a sentence?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Should have been or should of been?

The phrase should have indicates a missed obligation or opportunity in the past. In informal speech, it is contracted to should’ve, not “should of.” I should have (should’ve) known you were lying. Tom and Pauline are so selfish, they should have (should’ve) been there for you.

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